Decorative Sayings Blocks Tutorial

Trick or Treat Decorative Blocks

I’ve been seeing different versions of these decorative blocks online but couldn’t find a good tutorial showing how they’re made so I decided to give it a try and share with you my process.

Cut a 2x4 into various sizes.

1:  Cut a 2″x4″ board into various size blocks. Mine all ranged between 4″ and 6″. My husband took a sander and smoothed down the pointed edges for me for a more rounded worn in look.

Paint your blocks with craft paint.

Craft Paint

2:  Using craft paint and a drop cloth I painted the blocks leaving one face unpainted. The craft paint covered well and dried pretty quickly.

Paint the unfinished side with mod podge.

3:  After allowing the paint to dry I painted the unfinished side with a coat of mod podge.

Cut scrapbook paper to fit the face of your blocks.

4:  Cut scrapbook paper to fit the face of your block. I did a “patchwork” design on a few of the blocks with scraps. These small books of paper were just the right size for the project.

Glue paper to the face of the block.

5:  Lay the scrapbook paper on mod podged coated face and press out any air bubbles. When you have it positioned just right paint the mod podge on the top and sides of the paper. It will appear white as you’re painting it but will dry clear.

Cricut

 

Cricut Vinyl

Vinyl letters cut out on cricut

 6:  Using my cricut I cut out the letters on black vinyl. I found the vinyl at Wal-mart in the same section as the cricut  for about $9.00. I used about a third of the package for this set of blocks. I set my machine on slow speed and high pressure. The blade was set on 4 and the letters came out great. (If you don’t have a cricut you could make a pattern for your letters using word and just cut them out by hand.) I peeled the sticky vinyl letters from the backing and centered them on the dried face of the blocks.

Hot Glue Buttons and Ribbon on Blocks for Embellishment

7:  I hot glued various buttons and ribbon onto my blocks for embellishment and wahla your done!

Close Up "Trick"

Close Up "Or"

Close Up "Treat"

This was a really fun craft and one that would make great house-warming or Christmas gifts. Don’t fret about getting your letters perfectly straight or your paint perfect because the blocks are supposed to have a primitive feel to them. I can’t wait to make a set for every holiday and play around with new designs.

Trick or Treat Decorative Blocks

Decorating For Halloween

We’ve had a sudden change in temperature here in Virginia and the crisp air and talk of the upcoming homecoming football game has gotten me in the mood to decorate for Halloween. Here is what I’ve come up with to welcome my Trick or Treaters.

Halloween Wreath

Yes you guessed it..that is my little "red dog" watching me through the window.

I didn’t take pictures as I created my wreath since it was the first one I’ve ever made and my process included a lot of trial and error, but I thought I would include supply pictures to give you an idea of how it all came together. I hope this can inspire you..happy crafting!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Free Princess Crown Cross-Stitch Pattern

Princess Crown Cross Stitch Pattern

 

Click Here to Download This Pattern in PDF Form

This is a fun and easy cross-stitch pattern that would be great for beginners because it only uses one color thread. It is shown in pink but you could use any color you like for your crown! Enjoy!

DIY Monogrammed Hand Towel Tutorial

I was looking for a quick and easy house-warming present for my sister and decided to make her a set of monogrammed hand towels for her new kitchen out of some fabric scraps I had left over from other projects. Here is what I did:

White waffle knit hand towel

I started with a plain white waffle knit hand towel that I bought in a pack of 6 at T.J. Maxx.

Cut out a strip of fabric

I cut out a strip of fabric using a cutting grid and ruler to keep it nice and straight. I cut the fabric 1″ wider than than width of the towel and 1″ longer than I wanted the finished border to be.

I sewed a loose 1/2" basting stitch all around the perimeter of the material.

I sewed a loose basting stitch 1/2″ all the way around the perimeter of the material. This stitch serves as a folding guide line in the next step and helps you keep everything nice and straight.

Fold the material in on the guide line stitch and iron in place.

With the wrong side facing up fold your material on the guide line stitch you created and iron in place.

Pin the strip of material in place on your towel.

Turn your material right side up and pin it in place on your hand towel. I placed mine about 2″ up from the bottom of the towel. I used my ruler as a guide to make sure it was straight.

Sew all around the perimeter of the fabric using a 1/4" seam allowance.

I sewed all around the perimeter of the fabric using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Make sure when you sew that you are sewing through the folded portion of your fabric as well as the towel.

Cut a pattern out of paper for the letters of your monogram.

Cut a pattern out of paper for the letters of the your monogram. I used my cricut machine to cut the letter pattern but you could easily use any word processing program to design your letters and cut them out by hand. I cut the first and middle initial out at 4″ and the initial representing the last name at 5 1/2″.

Cut out letter pattern.

Iron double-sided fusing paper to the back of a piece of scrap fabric that is large enough to cut the initials from. Pin the paper initial pattern to the fabric and cut out the letters.

Pin the letter pattern to the fabric and cut out the shape.

 

Pin the initials in place on the towel and iron them on.

Pin the initials in placeon the towel and iron themin place. Set your sewing machine to a medium tight zig zag stitch and carefully stitch around the perimeter of each letter.

Zig zag stitch around the perimeter of each initial.

Congratulations you just created an easy house-warming gift that is extra special because it was home made by you! Your finished product should look something like this:

Finished Monogrammed Hand Towel

 

How to Make a Pair of Pajama Pants Using an Old Pair as a Pattern: DIY Tutorial

While fabric shopping the other day my daughter came across some silky blue and black zebra stripe material in the bargain bin that only a

14-year-old could love. She thought they would make “epic” pajama pants so we bought a couple of yards and got to work!

I didn’t want to purchase an expensive pattern for something so simple so I made my own by using an old pair of pajama pants she already had. Here is what I did:

Fold fabric in half length wise and lay old pajamas on top to cut by.

1: I folded the fabric in half length wise. I folded her old pajama bottoms in half and laid them on top of the fabric at the fold to cut by. Remember not to cut the fabric the same size as your finished pants because you have to allow room for sewing and turning right side out. I cut mine extra big because the pants I was using as a pattern did not fit  any more.

Cut the pants out leaving the fold uncut at the inner leg.

2:  Cut the pants out leaving the fold uncut at the inner leg.

Turn the cut piece wrong side out and place on fabric at fold.

3:  Turn the cut piece wrong side out and place on the fabric at the fold. Cut out the second leg of the pants exactly the same size as the first. Remember not to cut on the fold at the inner side of the leg.

Zig Zag stitch all the way around the edges of both pieces to prevent fraying.

 4: Zig zag stitch all the way around all of the cut edges of both pieces to prevent fraying. This was especially important using this silky fabric which wanted to bunch, pull, and fray badly.

Pin the two pieces right sides together and stitch the inner and outer legs together.

5:  Pin the two pieces right sides together and stitch the inner and outer leg seam. Double or even triple stitch the crotch area really well so that it doesn’t come apart when tension is put on that area when worn. Remember not to stitch together the waist or leg holes! Cut a piece of elastic 1 ” shorter than your waist measures.

Fold over (to the wrong side) the upper edge of the garment a bit more than the width of the elastic, and stitch all the way around, leaving about 3" unstitched.

6:  Fold over (to the wrong side) the upper edge of the garment a bit more than the width of the elastic, and stitch all the way around, leaving about 3″ unstitched.  This creates a waistband.  Place a safety-pin in one end of the elastic.  Going up through the opening in the waistband, and using the safety-pin to pull the elastic, thread the elastic all the way around the waistband, being careful not to lose the loose end of the elastic.

When the elastic is pulled through, stitch the two cut ends of the elastic together. Stitch the opening of the waistband closed.

7:    When the elastic is pulled through, stitch the two cut ends of the elastic together.  Stitch the opening of the waistband closed.

Iron the edge of the hem on both legs to create a good crease and then sew all the way around leg holes creating a hem.

8:  Iron the edge of the hem on both legs to create a good crease and then sew all the way around the leg holes to hold hem in place.

Trim stray threads and then model your new pj pants proudly!

9:  Trim your stray threads and them model your new p.j. pants proudly!

Easy to Knit Washcloth for Beginners

I love knitting washclothes. They are an easy, beautiful, and quick knitting project which is great for beginners. All you need to know to knit this washcloth is the basic knit and purl stitches.

If you need help with these stitches check out these great tutorials:

How to Knit

How to Purl

 You will use two patterns for this washcloth:

The Loop and  Cartridge Stitch

Materials: 

1 :  One Skein of Peaches and Cream Yarn in your favorite color

(or any  cotton worsted weight yarn)

2:   No. 7  4.5mm knitting needles

Washcloth Pattern/Instructions : 

Cast on 34 stitches

Not sure how to cast on? View this tutorial: Casting On

Loop Pattern Bottom Boarder

Row 1:  Knit all the way across

Row 2:  Knit one, Slip one (this means you slip the loop off of the left hand needle onto the right hand needle without knitting): repeat this pattern all the way across

Row 3: Knit all the way across

Row 4:  Knit two, Slip one : Then  continue knitting  one and  slipping one all the way across

Repeat

Repeat these four rows in order two more times  for a total of 12 rows all together. Congratulations you’ve created your washcloth’s bottom border and you should have something that looks like this:

The center of your washcloth will be knitted using a cartridge stitch pattern.

Cartridge Stitch Pattern:

Row 13:   Knit all the way across

Row 14: Purl all the way across

Row 15:  Knit all the way across

Row 16:  Knit all the way across

Row 17:  Purl all the way across

Row 18:  Knit all the way across

Repeat

Repeat these six rows in order 8 more times for a total of 36 Cartridge Stitch rows and a grand total of 48 rows counting your Loop Pattern border.

To finish up your washcloth you just repeat the loop pattern boarder again.

Loop Pattern Top Boarder

Row 49:  Knit all the way across

Row 50:  Knit one, Slip one (this means you slip the loop off of the left hand needle onto the right hand needle without knitting): repeat this pattern all the way across

Row 51: Knit all the way across

Row 52:  Knit two, Slip one : Then  continue knitting  one and  slipping one all the way across

Repeat

Repeat these four rows in order two more times  for a total of 12 more loop rows and a grand total of 60 rows all together.

To finish up just cast off and weave in the stray end.

Need help casting off and weaving stray end visit these tutorials:  Casting Off       Weaving in Ends

Congratulations on knitting your washcloth! Soon you’ll be making them for everyone.